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Louisville,
270-505-9219

Elizabethtown,
270-765-2000

Louisville,
270-505-9219

Reconsidering the alternate weeks custody schedule

On Behalf of | Mar 16, 2020 | Divorce, Family Law

In Kentucky as in the rest of the country, parents in a divorce might opt for the same method of splitting time in a 50-50 custody share as they have for decades. However, experts are beginning to advise that alternating weeks between the parents’ homes may not be the most effective strategy for the well-being of the children, and parents should consider other options.

When children are going through a transition, being apart from a parent for an entire week may be difficult for them psychologically. This can create separation anxiety at a time when children are already under stress. It is especially hard at the beginning of the week when children have become used to living with a parent and now cannot see them.

Moreover, alternating weeks can present logistical challenges. It requires constant communication as the children will need to speak with the parent they aren’t currently with. If the two parents have an acrimonious relationship, this may be difficult. Furthermore, there can be challenges when it comes to the work schedule of the parent who must arrange for pickups and drop-offs. As a result, experts are advocating that the two parents consider a custody schedule that allows for more frequent change of residences while still maintaining a 50-50 split between the parents.

A family law attorney may advise their client as to different ideas for a child custody schedule that would give that parent half of the time with the children but also be better for the children and the work schedule. Then, the attorney may help negotiate the custody agreement with the other parent’s attorney and help put it into place. If it is a matter that requires the court and cannot be resolved through negotiation, the attorney may argue the case in front of the judge.