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Serving the legal community for 10 years. You don’t thrive as a law firm for 10 years in a small, local community without consistently taking care of your clients and this firm takes pride in that fact and Jeremy puts his heart and soul in every case!

Free Initial Consultation

Elizabethtown,
270-765-2000

Louisville,
270-505-9219

Elizabethtown,
270-765-2000

Louisville,
270-505-9219

Brand
Brand

Serving the legal community for 10 years. You don’t thrive as a law firm for 10 years in a small, local community without consistently taking care of your clients and this firm takes pride in that fact and Jeremy puts his heart and soul in every case!

Free Initial Consultation

Elizabethtown,
270-765-2000

Louisville,
270-505-9219

Elizabethtown,
270-765-2000

Louisville,
270-505-9219

Brand

Should you open the door for police?

On Behalf of | Aug 6, 2021 | Criminal Defense

You have likely grown up with the notion that police are here to help you if you are in need of aid. While this holds true for many people, others may find officers an intimidating source of power and potential problems.

This makes it hard to decide what to do if the police come to your door and ask you to let them in. Should you oblige and let them? Or should you flex your rights?

You do not need to answer

FlexYourRights.com talks about your rights when the police come to your door. First, understand that you do not need to even answer it or indicate that you are home at all. An officer cannot force their way into your home unless they have reason to believe an emergency is occurring. If they do not, they will simply leave on their own if you do not answer.

What happens if you let them in?

Next, you do not have to let them in no matter what they say, unless they have a warrant. Officers may attempt to implement sneaky wording to try getting into your house. But once that happens, you lose any protections you may have had and officers can legally search the premises and seizure property.

To help avoid this, meet officers outside and close the door behind you. You can also speak to them through the window or a chain lock if your door has one. Explain in a polite but firm way that you cannot let them enter your property without a search warrant. If you feel the need, you can also contact legal help after they leave in case you believe they may come back.